sixpenceee:

I am speechless

This shoe both creeps me out and makes me want to wear them.

sixpenceee:

I am speechless

This shoe both creeps me out and makes me want to wear them.

mylovelybirds:

095_2014
bird kiss <3

mylovelybirds:

095_2014

bird kiss <3

My dachshund died two days ago and I'd like to save and whiten at least his skull... But I'm really, really struggling to prep him for maceration or dermestids :(
Anonymous

mydeadthingsdiary:

I’m really really sorry for your loss anon :( The loss of a much loved pet is a hard thing. In all honesty, I’d say be kind to yourself and give yourself time to grieve. Death is a big, though natural, change. Sometimes our minds take a little longer to accept and fully understand such big changes, and there’s no shame in that at all.

If you can, place him in the freezer for when you feel more able to work on preserving him. Or if you are able, allow mother nature to clean him completely. That way you can give him a burial of sorts with flowers or whatever you wish so you can say goodbye to his bodies flesh. I say a burial of sorts as you may wish to bury him, or leave him covered up on the surface of the ground - depending on what you are most comfortable with, able to do and how content you would be to not be able to find all of his skeletal remains afterwards.

I wish you luck and love anon x

mydeadthingsdiary :

Anon, when my pet rat passed away last year I left her to Mother Nature to clean for me since it was too hard for me to do it myself. I just put her body above ground and covered her with a bucket so raccoons wouldn’t get to it. After a few months, her bones were ready to be rinsed and whitened. I suggest that approach because it gives you time to find some closure. I’m sorry about your loss, anon. Good luck. I’m sure your doggy is glad you’ll keep him with you forever, even in death.

birdblog:

Raven - Hop, Skip, Fly Away… by Wales Birder ( Taking a Flickr Break) on Flickr.


I want a pet raven one day
llbwwb:

(via 500px / Beauty in South Luangwa by Sarah Joy Landon)
intrepidprofessor:

plasmatics-life:

Milky Way | (by Carlos Maxwell)

"You don’t understand.For every light you turn off, more lights come out.”I love the wilderness, but if anything, I love it even more at night without any nearby light sources. The farther away you are from civilization, the brighter the sky will be.

This is so beautiful.

intrepidprofessor:

plasmatics-life:

Milky Way | (by Carlos Maxwell)

"You don’t understand.
For every light you turn off, more lights come out.”

I love the wilderness, but if anything, I love it even more at night without any nearby light sources. The farther away you are from civilization, the brighter the sky will be.

This is so beautiful.

coyotequeen:

Here’s where most of my personal items, some craft items, and a few for sale items go- my bedroom
This is only a fraction of the room, there are many more skulls, pelts, and other areas of interest out of frame
The mannikans and pile of unfinished skulls aren’t even suppose to be in here, but due to the moisture problems they’re temporarily being stored in my room to avoid any mold growth till we can get the work room back in working order
since we are still newly moved in, things in my room are still being moved around and stuff, hopefully in a few months things will be more put together, I’ll have even more stuff, and the work room will be in order- once that finally happens, I may post updated photos of both rooms, since I know /I/ and other vulture culture folks love seeing each other’s spaces

I shoot cats with my bb gun in my neighborhood, thats how I take care of population control.
Anonymous

forestferncreations:

feralxbones:

Cool story broski.

Total felony animal cruelty in many states. But have fun being a compete piece of shit human

gimme that bb gun so i can shoot you with it

Why stop at a BB gun. Here in Texas we have a shoot to kill law. Which means if you’re on my property fucking with my cats, you’re dead meat.

Hi! I'm asking around the bone collecting community, what do you recommend for a new collector? What are the absolute essential tools? How do you treat bones after you've collected them? If you've found them in the woods, how do you clean them off?
Anonymous

bonemonger:

Hiya, these are all excellent questions!

For a new collector I’d recommend looking at photos of full animal skeletons firstly and get familiar with some bones; the amount of time I’ve seen bird pelvis’ listed as skulls!

Essential tools:
Cheap toothbrushes/old used ones for scrubbing bones (2 for 25p - Tesco)
Sponges for the larger projects (pack of 4 for £1 - Tesco)
Washing up liquid/”dish soap” (less than a pound - tesco)
Plastic tubs (free with Chinese food sometimes? If not Poundland has some okay ones, Ikea does a set of 17 different sized tubs for about £4)

If you’re collecting fresh roadkill I’d also say get a pack of disposable gloves off eBay and maybe a scalpel handle and a pack of 100 blades (scalpel + blades ~£7)

If you want your bones nice and white hydrogen peroxide is a must, you can get 10 litres from eBay for ~£20, search “hydrogen peroxide stain remover”

I usually give my new bones a good soak (to get rid of beasties) and then a scrub and a peroxide bath if it needs it, this is really where the toothbrush, sponges and fairy liquid come in handy!

Also check your laws! Don’t want to be doing anything illegal, i.e. bird bones in North America!

Good bone hunting!

mydeadthingsdiary:

manywaystoskinacat:

mydeadthingsdiary:



Table from “Jake’s Bones”


This is a good graph but a bit hard to understand. I’d like to point out a few things that I disagree with though.1. Fresh dead body —&gt; Yes Dermestids/Mummified or dried —&gt; No dermestidsDon’t do the first, you will kill your dermestids. Not only do dermestid beetles not like fresh meat, but the moisture in the guts will attract mites and kill them. The first insect to a kill are flies, and flies will lay hundreds of eggs on the carcass and leave - maggots attract moisture - maggots will kill your dermestids. Only use dried/jerkified carcasses and skulls for dermestids.If you have a mummified/bone dry skull or carcass, moisten it a bit by spraying it with water, THEN give to dermestids.2. Fresh dead body —&gt; No warm water(I assume “washing water” means with soap? Don’t use soap). You WANT warm water for maceration, ideally, you want it to be about 70-80*F. Cleaning a carcass with cold water can be achieved- I’ve done it before - but it takes a long time.3. Mummified —&gt; Leave above ground in open airThis will do nothing for a mummified carcass. More often than not, mummified carcasses are found above-ground in open air and are mummified because of the air and lack of moisture.

I agree it isn’t 100% on some things but it’s good as a rough guide for the methods of cleaning available.
1. With the fresh body I think he means you can’t give dermestids rotting tissue. 
2. The graph says soak in warm biological washing liquid ie. dish soap / clothes detergent so I assume he means you can’t just pop a whole freshly dead animal in warm water for it to clean up. 
3. Ok no I agree completely on this point

mydeadthingsdiary:

manywaystoskinacat:

mydeadthingsdiary:

table key

Table from “Jake’s Bones”

This is a good graph but a bit hard to understand. I’d like to point out a few things that I disagree with though.
1. Fresh dead body —> Yes Dermestids/
Mummified or dried —> No dermestids

Don’t do the first, you will kill your dermestids. Not only do dermestid beetles not like fresh meat, but the moisture in the guts will attract mites and kill them. The first insect to a kill are flies, and flies will lay hundreds of eggs on the carcass and leave - maggots attract moisture - maggots will kill your dermestids. Only use dried/jerkified carcasses and skulls for dermestids.
If you have a mummified/bone dry skull or carcass, moisten it a bit by spraying it with water, THEN give to dermestids.
2. Fresh dead body —> No warm water
(I assume “washing water” means with soap? Don’t use soap). You WANT warm water for maceration, ideally, you want it to be about 70-80*F. Cleaning a carcass with cold water can be achieved- I’ve done it before - but it takes a long time.
3. Mummified —> Leave above ground in open air
This will do nothing for a mummified carcass. More often than not, mummified carcasses are found above-ground in open air and are mummified because of the air and lack of moisture.

I agree it isn’t 100% on some things but it’s good as a rough guide for the methods of cleaning available.

1. With the fresh body I think he means you can’t give dermestids rotting tissue. 

2. The graph says soak in warm biological washing liquid ie. dish soap / clothes detergent so I assume he means you can’t just pop a whole freshly dead animal in warm water for it to clean up. 

3. Ok no I agree completely on this point

Δ